Samsung led smartphone shipments for 2021, beating out Apple, study claims


Lisa Eadicicco/CNET

All around 1.35 billion smartphones were being shipped in 2021, in accordance to IDC’s quarterly cellular mobile phone tracker. Total, fewer smartphones had been shipped in the last quarter of 2021 compared to Q4 2020 but in general, extra ended up shipped last yr than in 2020, IDC mentioned Thursday.

“The provide chain and element shortages started to have significant influence on the smartphone sector as we entered the 2nd half of the year, and this proceeds to be the situation as we’ve now entered 2022,” stated Ryan Reith, IDC’s team VP of Throughout the world Cellular Gadget Trackers.

IDC mentioned it has viewed strong interest in foldable phones and 5G phones.

Go through much more: Most effective telephones to get for 2022

Samsung retook the best location for smartphone shipments in 2021, holding 20% current market share globally immediately after shipping and delivery 272 million telephones for the duration of the yr. Apple arrived in second, at 235.7 million telephones, Xiaomi with 191 million, Oppo with 133.5 million and Vivo with 128.3 million.

A bit unique figures from Counterpoint Analysis, also launched Thursday, showed very similar results: Samsung in initially location with 271 million telephones transported during 2021, Apple in next with 237.9 million, Xiaomi with 190 million, Oppo with 143.2 million and Vivo with 131.3 million.

Read also: Greatest Iphone for 2022: Which of Apple’s 8 telephones is correct for you?

It can be the to start with time the smartphone current market has developed on a yearly basis because 2017, according to Counterpoint, with Apple clocking document shipments.

“The world smartphone restoration in 2021 followed a pandemic-strike 2020 and subsequent pent-up need,” stated Harmeet Singh Walia, Counterpoint senior analyst, introducing demand was driven by Apple’s first 5G phone, the Apple iphone 12. “The industry recovery could have been even superior if not for the part shortages.”